Here’s Your Guide To The Blurting Revision Technique

Hello everyone it’s Zainab, welcome or welcome back to my blog! If you’ll remember, I recently wrote a post on Active Recall, and how that can help you in school. In the post, I mentioned that blurting is a form of active recall – and today I’ll be getting into the specifics of it. Let’s jump into it!

What Is Blurting?

Blurting is essentially what it sounds like – blurting out information! But the idea is, you do this without looking at any of your notes prior to doing this. That way, your brain has to work harder to retrieve information (this is active recall!) That way, everything that’s been blurted is consolidated information and you’ll have a chance to identify any gaps in your knowledge.

Where Do You Start?

Start by choosing a subject and then choosing a topic within that subject. For my example, I chose Geography and then within that: River Processes.(But you can do this for any subject). I’d also like to note that it will be much more easier afterwards if you choose medium sized topics that are already sectioned off in your notes / revision guide because it will make your life a lot easier.

Then, I’d find a blank piece of paper – and blurt down everything I already know about river processes. Remember, don’t look at anything prior because the key is to make your brain work.

Once I’ve done this, I’ll look back through the notes for that subject and add in any extra information or correct any mistakes I’ve made. And I’ll highlight them to make it very clear – because the important information is the information I don’t know.

How Do You Progress Afterwards?

After you’ve finished the blurt, you just have to revise the content again. Remember, the key is to revise your weak points (the areas that you highlighted on your finished blurt) because that’s where the gaps in your knowledge are, and there’s no point revising what you’re already confident on. Remember, this helps with efficiency so working smart would be revising only what you need to revise!

Again, it’s best to do this with another active recall technique. Like flashcards, teaching someone or even a second blurt.


I hope this proved useful for any of you who have exams coming up! Let me know in the comments your favourite revision methods.

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How Active Recall Can Help To Level Up Your Studying

Hey everyone, welcome or welcome back to Zainab Chats! In the midst of back to school content, I thought I’d share a study technique that I learnt about at the end of last year which is active recall. It’s a game-changing study tip, one that’s helped so many other students (including myself) in school, so today I’ll quickly be sharing this technique with you guys. Whether it’s for school, university, work etc – this can work for anyone. Let’s jump into it!

What is Active Recall?

Active Recall has fairly recently become quite a renowned study tip for students because it’s so universal. Essentially, Active Recall works by you having to retrieve the information from your brain instead of taking it in like conventional study methods. There are many researchers who have found that using active recall in revision has proven to be much more effective then rereading notes or other inefficient methods!

Read More About Active Recall

Methods of Active Recall

  • Past Papers
  • Answering Your Own Questions
  • Blurting
  • Flash Cards
  • Teaching Someone Else

How Does It Work?

Active Recall works simply by making sure the knowledge from your revision goes to your long term memory instead of your short term memory so that you can easily recall it in a test.
By using a recall method instead of the traditional way of just looking over your work, it’s going into your brain once again and will be remembered for longer because your brain is really working in order to retrieve that information.
It also works out to be a lot more effective because once you have recalled everything you remember, that means you can spend more time focusing on what you don’t know and learn them instead of just repeating what you do know.

Read More About The Effectiveness Of Active Recall


Thank you so much for reading this blog post, I know it was a short one but that’s because I’m planning to go over each method of active recall in more detail in a separate post. So, let me know what you’d like to see next!

You want to see more of me and get exclusive updates on my blog? Well check out my socials!
Instagram – For exclusive updates on posts
Goodreads – You can see any books I’ve read or even recommend me one!
Contact Me if you would like to collaborate or have any other inquiries
Any suggestions or feel like chatting? Comment down below!

Have a lovely week everyone!